Children at Great Ormond Street Hospital Get Creative for RHS Chelsea Flower Show

Children at Great Ormond Street Hospital have been having fun creating colourful leaf designs which will be incorporated into the seating for The Morgan Stanley Garden for Great Ormond Street Hospital, which will feature at RHS Chelsea Flower Show in May 2016.

Leaf Fabric GOSH 2 copy

The Show Garden, which is designed by Chris Beardshaw, will appear briefly at RHS Chelsea Flower Show before it moves to its permanent home at Great Ormond Street Hospital immediately after the show, where it will provide a much needed, private and reflective space for parents and families of the children undergoing care at the hospital.

The children were invited to join workshops across the hospital throughout the holidays, so patients’ siblings could also join in the fun. The series of workshops were organised by GO Create! Great Ormond Street Hospital’s in-house arts programme and Chris Beardshaw’s design team.  The children were encouraged to be as imaginative and inventive as they liked, using as many colours and different materials as they wanted in their leaf designs.

Morgan Stanley volunteer Zoe with GOSH patient Vikinte, 7

Once completed the Children’s leaves were displayed in the hospital for everyone to admire, before being scanned and sent to Chris Beardshaw’s design team who have incorporated the designs into a beautifully vibrant fabric –(sample below). The fabric is being used to cover seating in the Show Garden which can be seen by the many thousands of visitor to Chelsea Flower Show, before becoming part of the permanent garden back at the hospital.

Susie Hall, Head of GO Create! said, “At Go Create we strive to create a relaxing, engaging and child-friendly environment to help patients adjust to what can be an extremely difficult time. Everyone has been thrilled to have been involved in the making of this wonderful garden which will be appreciated by families and staff alike. The patients are always delighted for their artwork to be celebrated and shown to the public and they have loved getting involved and being inventive with their designs. They’re really looking forward to seeing their artwork displayed in the garden.”

Chris Beardshaw said, “We really wanted to find a way to engage the children in the making of the garden and it has been wonderful to see the individuality and creativity of all the leaf designs.  We are really looking forward to showing the children how their designs are play such a colourful role on the seating in the finished garden.”

More information about Chris Beardshaw’s garden design at this years Chelsea Flower Show will be is coming to Shoot Show Gardens very soon.

Modern Slavery Garden

Juliet Sargeant Designs Show Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016 to Highight the Existence of Modern Slavery in the UK & Effect Change

The Juliet Sargeant Designs show Garden is a celebration of the British Parliment passing the Modern Slavery Act  into law on 26 March 2015.

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However, this law is just the beginning. Ninety percent of actual change in circumstances is due to the actions of law enforcement and the general public. It is with this fact in mind that a group of like-minded individuals from all walks of life came together and created this garden for the RHS Chelsea Flower Show.

Despite this law, statistics tell us there are an estimated 13,000 enslaved people in the UK currently, and more than 27 million people worldwide.  The aim of this garden is to raise public awareness of this issue. “Being involved in the RHS Chelsea Flower show affords us a wonderful opportunity to get the message into the living rooms of the great British public, build support and help end modern slavery” Mirabelle Galvin, Modern Slavery Garden Team Member.

The garden features a number of doors. First to meet the eye are bright, inviting doors surrounded by colourful planting schemes, used to illustrate the ordinary streets in which we live. Behind these doors, we glimpse a series of dark, imposing, locked doors, symbolising  the hidden ‘behind closed doors’ nature of modern slavery. 

Translucent planting separates the front of the garden from the darker inner space. Feathery fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) and the stems of Verbascum and lupin (Lupinus) echo the vertical iron railings surrounding the garden. A ribbon of warm apricot and orange hues run around the perimeter of the garden and compliment the bright colours of the painted front doors. These ribbons include the brightly-coloured, cottage garden favourites, like Peony ‘Coral Sunset’ (Paeonia ‘Coral Sunset’) and Anthriscus ‘Ravenswing’. Included are recently introduced varieties like Geum ‘Totally Tangerine’ , launched at Chelsea in 2010, and Heuchera macrantha ‘Palace Purple’ , which debuted in 1983.

Juliet has also chosen to include static pauses in the planting with Coprosma ‘Lemon and Lime’ and Coprosma ‘Pina Colada’ These contrast with the more dramatic forms of Red hook sedge (Uncinia rub) and New Zealand wind grass (Amenanthele lessoniana). This is clearly a garden of contrasts, the bright, uplifting colours surrounded the black heart of the garden’s interior.

RHS London Botanic Art Show

The RHS are very busy bees and have lots of spring time shows scheduled for 2016.

First off is The London Botanic Art Show from the 26th & 27th of February. Head to RHS Lindey Hall, London for an exhibition of botanical art from around the world.

 

b7b64f838364947910e36887efd112e2Botanical illustration by Louis van Houtte,Fuchsias, 1877

You can wander through the pop up exhibition spaces, talk with the artists, watch them in action, pick up tips for your own artistic works and even get creative with prints and pressed flowers.

For more information and to book tickets for this show visit the RHS

Are you attending The London Botanic Art Show? Please email or tweet us your photos of the event.

And watch this space for updates on upcoming events…

 

 

 

An Historic Spring Time Adventure

Geoffrey & Etta Wyatt will be opening the gates of their parkland garden for all to see.

The magical place can be found in the South downs National Park with views towards Cissbury Ring and the sea.

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This spring time garden was designed by Oliver Wyatt in 1945, a member of the Royal Horticultural Society and a snowdrop enthusiast who discovered and named two varieties of snowdrops; Galanthus Maidwell L and Maidwell C,  and these can both be found at Cissbury.

The garden boasts a wilderness filled with breathtaking drifts of Snowdrops, Daffodils and Bluebells, as well as a magnificent dawn redwood, holm oak hedge, many cedars and shrubbery.

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The garden is open to all on Saturday  27 February and Thursday 3 March from 10am – 4pm. Admission is just £4.00 per adult and children go for free.  Dogs welcome and home made tea is available.

For maps and more information visit NGS Cissbury

As a NGS garden, the proceeds go to charities such as; Macmillan Cancer Support, Marie Curie Cancer Care and many more.